The Kids Want Communism: Second Installment

Artists: Nir Harel, Ohad Meromi, Noa Yafe, Nicole Wermers, Jonathan Gold, Micah Hesse, Israeli Communist Party Archive, Praxis School, Nabil Maleh, Piyasiri Gunaratna, Nosratollah Karimi, Anna Lukashevsky (The New Barbizon), and Raanan Harlap.
Curator: Joshua Simon

Universalism is the thing that got lost with globalization. Globalization is the constant availability of all spheres of life for exploitation by capital. As the Marxist geographer David Harvey explains, on political, economic, and cultural levels, globalization is built on the reinforcement, anchoring, and exploitation of various geographical differences. This way, capitalism transfers every limit that it encounters from one geography to another, so that the limitation becomes a new financial opportunity.

The collapse of the Soviet Bloc in 1990 was the moment when capitalist democracy triumphed over the socialist police state. Since then, we can see how two elements of these opposing forces joined together in creating a capitalist police state. Socialism and democracy was abandoned in view of a reality in which the Soviet Union no longer existed. In the absence of the persistent challenge presented by the very existence of the Soviet Union, the reality of the welfare state has worn thin. Now, the procedural democracies in which we live, suspend liberties at all times, and shed the liberalism they prided themselves on during the Cold War. This way, the split in the center of our political lives is shaped in light of the tension between capitalism and democracy.

One can see the 2011 Occupy movement protests around the world as an expression articulating this recognition, whereas the Brexit referendum is another example from a different political direction. What started before our very eyes with the collapse of real existing socialism comes to an end with the collapse of the neo-liberal arrangements. The intensity and the accelerated pace of the political events around us, should be considered in relation to the implosion of the Soviet Bloc and the shock therapy that the post-Soviet economies underwent.

On the one hand, the option of the communist possibility and its absence today finds its visual-dialectical expression in Types of Stereo – a 3D video work created by artist Micah Hesse especially for the exhibition. On the other hand, the incessant wallowing in the collapse of the Soviet Union, which continues until this very day, is expressed in Soviet Haifa – a series of paintings by Anna Lukashevsky in which she responds to her fellow New Barbizon group members, who in the first installment of The Kids Want Communism presented works they painted as children growing up in the Soviet Union. Additionally, on the second floor, continuing from the first installment, are installations by Noa Yafe and Raanan Harlap. The former presents The Red Star – a diorama of Mars, and the latter presents Public House – a wall relief of a tenement apartment. Next to Harlap’s installation is Ohad Meromi’s Structure for Rest – a space for daydreaming which was displayed in the entrance hall in the first installment. Nicole Wermers’s Great Soviet Encyclopedia – an incubator/sarcophagus displaying the English edition of the encyclopedia, is also continuing from the first installment. Jonathan Gold continues to paint jointly with children, groups, and individuals visiting the exhibition his mural of people standing in line.

A display curated by Vladimir Vidmar of Škuc gallery, Ljubljana — which is also part of The Kids Want Communism network — consist of publications, documents, and photographs associated with the Yugoslav school of Marxist thought — Praxis, which saw the height of its influence in the years 1963-1975, and which attracted some of the greatest Marxist thinkers of the time from the Soviet Bloc and Western countries, such as Ernst Bloch, Agnes Heller, György Lukács, Milan Kangrga, Erich Fromm and Herbert Marcuse. Internationalism and the brotherhood of nations are the focus of a special project created for the exhibition using the archives of The Communist Party of Israel — a series of photographs documenting the political Jewish-Arab cooperation in Palestine, especially surrounding an expedition to Yugoslavia to help in the construction of the railroad to Sarajevo.

On the one hand, the option of the communist possibility and its absence today finds its visual-dialectical expression in Types of Stereo — a 3D video work created by artist Micah Hesse especially for the exhibition. On the other hand, the incessant wallowing in the collapse of the Soviet Union, which continues until this very day, is expressed in Soviet Haifa — a series of paintings by Anna Lukashevsky in which she responds to her fellow New Barbizon group members, who in the first installment of The Kids Want Communism presented works they painted as children growing up in the Soviet Union. Additionally, on the second floor, continuing from the first installment, are installations by Noa Yafe and Raanan Harlap. The former presents The Red Star — a diorama of Mars, and the latter presents Public House — a wall relief of a tenement apartment. Next to Harlap’s installation is Ohad Meromi’s Structure for Rest — a space for daydreaming which was displayed in the entrance hall in the first installment. Nicole Wermers’s Great Soviet Encyclopedia — an incubator/sarcophagus displaying the English edition of the encyclopedia, is also continuing from the first installment. Jonathan Gold continues to paint jointly with children, groups, and individuals visiting the exhibition his mural of people standing in line.

Past Exhibitions:

11.11.2015 - 09.07.2015

Mini Golf Bat Yam

05.07.2014 - 03.04.2014

Ruti Sela: New Exhibition

04.03.2014 - 07.11.2013

Goods

03.11.2012 - 11.10.2012

Attributes

29.02.2012 - 07.09.2011

Schooling: Wall, Education, Class

06.11.2010 - 23.09.2010

Video Trilogy: Signals

26.06.2010 - 06.03.2010

Anticipation Time

18.04.2009 - 15.01.2009

Laptopia #5: Sound Exhibition

13.02.2010 - 12.11.2009

Idiolect

26.08.2009 - 25.05.2009

FACTORY

17.07.2008 - 17.04.2008

MoBY Hosting

01.09.2007 - 25.08.2007

Video Marina